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Child Development Skills: The Milestones from 1 Year and Up

Miniland Educational: Playing today, for tomorrow

By Miniland

January 26, 2017

8 Minute read

All child development skills happen at a different rate from child to child. However, there is a general guide to the milestones that your little one should be hitting.

It’s imperative to know what these milestones are, and although your baby could just be a slow learner – it’s also a way to pick up on child development skills problems

Even though these skills vary from individual to individual, there are five main categories that children should be developing at relatively the same rate. These are the skills to keep an eye on:

  • Gross motor skills
  • Hand-eye coordination
  • Language
  • Cognitive
  • Social and emotional

Below is a simple child development skills guide that will help you see how your child should be developing and will give you the platform to identify developmental problems early on.

Year 1

Gross motor skills:

  • Should be able to get to sitting position without help
  • Can go on hands and knees but generally crawls on belly
  • Pulls themselves up to standing and may be able to walk holding onto furniture
  • Fast developers could even take one or two steps without assistance.

one year old.jpg

Hand-eye coordination:

  • Puts objects in and out of containers
  • Uses the ‘pincer’ grip
  • Pokes with index finger
  • Able to let go of things voluntarily
  • Will try and scribble.

Language:

  • Responds and understand “no”
  • May respond to other simple requests
  • Lots of babbling
  • Could start saying things like “dada” and “mama” or “uh-oh!”
  • Starts to attempt imitating words

Cognitive:

  • Shakes, bangs, drops and breaks things to find out what they are
  • Starting to use objects like cups in the correct way
  • Will respond to the right picture when a word is said
  • Imitates your gestures

Social and emotional:

  • Shy with strangers
  • Cries when parent leaves
  • Tests parents with behavior
  • Starts to finger feed himself
  • Can become scared in situations
  • Identifies which people and toys they prefer over others

Year 2 and 3

Gross motor skills:

  • Can walk, run and jump (if a little unsteadily)
  • Kicks a ball
  • Can get onto and off furniture with no help
  • Starts to walk up and down stairs. Sometimes without assistance

Hand-eye coordination:

  • Loves to scribble
  • Can build tower of blocks and gets excited to knock them down again
  • Starts to favor one hand over the other.

Language:

  • Can point to object or picture when it’s named
  • Can say several short words
  • Can use short sentences
  • Can follow easy instructions
  • Repeats what they hear.

Cognitive:

  • Start to really enjoy make-believe play
  • Can sort different shapes, colors and categories
  • Easily finds hidden objects

Social and emotional:

  • Starts to imitate others
  • Developing self-awareness
  • Excited about company of other kids
  • Can become defiant
  • Swings between new independence and separation anxiety

Year 4:

Gross motor skills:

  • Well developed with regards to sport and movement
  • Throwing, kicking and catching should come relatively easily
  • Standing and hopping on one foot
  • Takes on stairs with no support

Hand-eye coordination:

  • Can begin to draw shapes
  • Draws weirdly shaped people
  • Can use scissors
  • Start to learn to copy alphabetic letters.

Language:

  • Can speak in sentences of up to six words
  • Basic grasp of simple grammar
  • Likes to tell stories
  • Confidence in speaking to new people

Cognitive:

  • Recognizes and names basic colors
  • Can count a few small numbers
  • Begins to understand time
  • Can simply retell stories that they’ve heard
  • Enjoys fantasy play

Social and emotional:

  • Curious about new experiences
  • Loves company of other children
  • Plays ‘house’
  • Increasingly imitates things around them
  • Dress and undress themselves
  • Starts to understand negotiation
  • Gets confused between fantasy and reality.

Year 5

Gross motor skills:

  • Hops
  • Swings
  • Climbs
  • Skips
  • Swims
  • Takes an interest in team sport

five year old.jpg

Hand-eye coordination:

  • Can copy shapes proficiently
  • Better at drawing realistic people
  • Can write some letters
  • Can use cutlery at the table
  • Starting to care for own toilet needs

Language:

  • Recalls more complicated stories
  • Names most of the colors
  • Uses future tense
  • Knows name and address and other vital info

Cognitive:

  • Count up to twenty
  • Understands the concept of time
  • Learns and can talk about everyday things like money, groceries, and appliances

Social and emotional:

  • Wants to please and get praise from those around them
  • Wants to be more like friends to fit in
  • Becomes more theatrical
  • More independent
  • Aware of gender differences
  • Can tell the difference between fantasy and reality

Child development skills all come along at a different pace, and just because your child isn’t exactly on point – it doesn’t mean they have an issue. However, if you notice your child falling very far behind it’s best to get it checked on.

Educational toys are a fun and entertaining way to get your children to develop the necessary skills. At Miniland, we strive to create toys that are developed specifically with child development skills in mind that will help parents enhance their child through play.

 Educational Family